This drone photo by photographer Tim Harvey of the Kaukauna Pictures Facebook group shows the empty landscape surrounding the Grignon Mansion after all the infected trees had been removed.
This drone photo by photographer Tim Harvey of the Kaukauna Pictures Facebook group shows the empty landscape surrounding the Grignon Mansion after all the infected trees had been removed.

KAUKAUNA — Trees have been coming down in parks throughout Kaukauna in recent weeks, and the city says the invasive emerald ash borer is to blame.

City crews have been removing trees from local parks over the past few weeks.

Drone photos by photographer Tim Harvey of the Kaukauna Pictures Facebook group shows the empty landscape surrounding the Grignon Mansion after all the infected trees had been removed.

These are all ash trees that have been infected with the emerald ash borer and pose a safety risk for park users, according to a social media post from the city of Kaukauna.

Most parks throughout the city have at least a couple trees in need of removal.

The good news is that the trees will be replanted in all areas that have removals, according to the city.

Anyone with questions can contact the Kaukuana Street Department at 920-766-6337.

The emerald ash borer was first found in Appleton in February of 2015, according to the Bureau of Plant Industry of the DATCP. Outagamie County already had been under quarantine for EAB because of its proximity to an infestation in the Village of Sherwood in Calumet County.


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EAB adults lay eggs on the bark of ash trees in mid- to late summer. When the eggs hatch a
week or two later, the larvae burrow under the bark for the winter and feed, forming the
characteristic S-shaped tunnels and destroying the tree’s ability to take up nutrients and water. In
summer, the adults emerge through D-shaped holes in the bark.

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By Dan Plutchak

Dan Plutchak, born and raised in Kaukauna, is cofounder of Kaukauna Community News.